Jennifer Conrad

Jennifer Conrad
jconrad@alleganps.org | (269) 673-7002 x5715 | Class website

Biography

After graduating from Allegan High School, I spent 8 years in Ann Arbor before returning home to join the teaching staff in 1999. I earned my BA in English Language and Literature from the University of Michigan, my post-baccalaureate teaching certification from Eastern Michigan University, and my MA in English with a teaching emphasis from Western Michigan University. I currently teach American Humanities, Children's Literature, English 11, Photojournalism, and Yearbook, and am the Girls Varsity Tennis assistant coach. My husband also teaches at AHS, and our son currently attends one of the local elementary schools. For more information about me, my teaching experience, teaching philosophy, or professional development, please see the "About Ms. Conrad" page of my website. 

Classes and Essential Standards

I ensure high levels of learning for all students using these essential standards as my guide:

American Humanities (Grade 11)

  • Students can determine 2 or more themes/central ideas of text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another.
  • Students can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful.   
  • Students can determine an author’s point of view and explain his/her purpose for writing the text; I can identify when an author is using specific techniques to persuade the audience.
  • Students can introduce a precise, knowledgeable claim, and logically sequence claims, counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
  • Students can develop claims and counterclaims thoroughly, pointing out strengths and limitations of both, providing relevant evidence, and considering audience knowledge and bias.
  • Students can develop a topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, definitions, details, quotations, or other information appropriate to the audience.

  • Students can create questions and locate key textual evidence to contribute to a discussion on a given topic.

Children's Literature (Grade 12)

  • Students can determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • Students can produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  • Students can develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

English 11 (Grade 11)

  • Students can determine 2 or more themes/central ideas of text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another.
  • Students can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful.   
  • Students can determine an author’s point of view and explain his/her purpose for writing the text; I can identify when an author is using specific techniques to persuade the audience.
  • Students can introduce a precise, knowledgeable claim, and logically sequence claims, counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
  • Students can develop claims and counterclaims thoroughly, pointing out strengths and limitations of both, providing relevant evidence, and considering audience knowledge and bias.
  • Students can develop a topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, definitions, details, quotations, or other information appropriate to the audience.

  • Students can create questions and locate key textual evidence to contribute to a discussion on a given topic.

Photojournalism (Grade 9-12)

  • Students can take photos using photo composition elements.
  • Students can create appropriate open questions for interviews.
  • Students can use factual information and interview results to write captions for photos.

Yearbook (Grade 9-12)

  • There are no essential standards for this class. The goal is to create the pages to complete the yearbook. Some students focus more on photography aspect of the book, while others focus on the writing aspect or the advertising aspect.